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Majorly Mad

My theme for the Blogging from A to Z Challenge is contronyms. A contronym is a word with two or more opposite meanings, making it its own antonym. Click here to find out more about these quirky words.
 
Molly with the letter MWe've arrived at the start of the third week of the A to Z Challenge with the letter M. Are you starting to feel the burn? But we have to keep pushing through the pain, so the contronym for today is mad.
 
Mad – carried away by intense anger or hatred
 
~ or ~
 
Mad – carried away by enthusiasm or desire
 
Similar to hysterical, at its core mad is about intense emotion – it’s just that one is positive and the other is negative. Mad has various meanings, and besides these two opposite emotions, many of the other definitions also contained a range of emotional words: gaiety, merriment, resentful, excitement, confusion, agitation, frantic, hilarious, impetuous, irrational, and so on. So people who are mad are definitely worked up in some way about something.
 
I’m mad about my dogs . . .
Chloe birthday
 
. . . but sometimes I’m mad at my dogs.
Bad Chloe
 
And then there was Mad About You . . .
Mad About You
 
. . . which was a show about a recently wed couple who were mad about each other, but got into plenty of sitcom squabbles that left them mad at each other.
 
Lisa was mad about the portrait Leonardo painted of her.
 
Is Lisa pissed off because she wanted him to show off her pearly whites or is she thrilled because she knows the way he painted her smile will ensure her fame for at least 500 years?
Mona Lisa
 
Are you familiar with contronyms? Can you think of any other ‘M’ contronyms? How Marvelous does Molly look with her letter M?

Leaving Left

My theme for the Blogging from A to Z Challenge is contronyms. A contronym is a word with two or more opposite meanings, making it its own antonym. Click here to find out more about these quirky words.
 
Lily with the letter LAfter yesterday's hiccup with having no contronyms for K, I was happy to have several to choose from for the letter L. I decided to go with left, but as I was poking around in several dictionaries, I realized that the present tense of left (leave) is also a contronym, even though only the past tense version is on any of the lists. I figured we might as well go for the twofer and feature both left and leave.
 
Left/Leave - to go out or away from; depart
 
~ or ~
 
Left/Leave - to remain; stay in the same position
 
Please don't leave me behind. I will be very sad.
Sweet puppy
 
Poor mama dogs have to watch their babies leave, never to be seen again.
Dog Family
 
Frank left in a huff at my refusal to cook dinner, but he left his wallet behind. I ordered pizza.
Empty Wallet
 
Diana is overwhelmed with emotion when she comes home after a long day to a surprise birthday party. She's touched by her friends' thoughtfulness, but she really wanted to soak in a hot bath and go to bed. The party rages for hours. Now, of all the revelers, only Trevor's left.
Birthday Party
 
So, does Diana need to call the cops on her own party to get all of her overzealous friends (except for Trevor who already went home) to leave? Or has everyone else gone home, leaving her to receive an unexpected birthday gift from Trevor? With a contronym involved, a simple story gets an ambiguous ending. 
 
Are you familiar with contronyms? There are other ‘L’ contronyms out there, can you think of any? How Lovely is Lily with her letter L

 

Puppy image courtesy of stock.xchng

Dog family image courtesy of adzica

Wallet image courtesy of scottchan / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Party image courtesy of foobean01

Kooky Keratin

My theme for the Blogging from A to Z Challenge is contronyms. A contronym is a word with two or more opposite meanings, making it its own antonym. Click here to find out more about these quirky words.
 
Freya with the letter KRemember yesterday when I was whining about having only one contronym option for the letter J? Well, it turns out the language gods have a sense of humor. That’s because after scouring all the lists of contronyms I could google up, I was unable to find a single K contronym. Zero. Zilch. Nada. I never would have guessed K would be the one to give me trouble. I mean Q and X are the usual troublemakers, but even they managed to show up for the contronym convention. Come on, K, get it together!
 
We’ll just have to muddle through with the next best thing – a contronym where the second letter is K: sKin. Plus, Keratin makes up the outer layer of skin, and as a K word that has to count for something, right?
 
Skin – to remove or strip off outer covering or skin
 
~ or ~
 
Skin – to cover with or as with skin
 
Like joint yesterday, skin is one of those words where verb versions are used to describe actions involving the noun version. In this case of opposite meanings, one is ‘taking off’ and the other is ‘putting on.’
 
Since I wrote that supremely awesomely spectacular story yesterday showcasing the horrors of joint, I fear any attempt to do the same for skin will end up extremely derivative of my earlier masterpiece. Instead, I’ll leave you with a picture of a character from a truly talented horror writer, Thomas Harris.
Buffalo Bill from Silence of the Lambs
 
Buffalo Bill from Silence of the Lambs skins his female victims so he can skin himself in a woman suit.
 
If the picture puts you in the mood to watch the entire Buffalo Bill dancing scene, then you can find it here, but remember it’s not safe for work since it has salty language and, uh, interesting dancing.
 
Are you familiar with contronyms? Even though I couldn’t find any ‘K’ contronyms that doesn’t mean there isn’t one hiding out there - can you think of any? How Kissable is Freya with her letter K?

 

Jammin' Joints

My theme for the Blogging from A to Z Challenge is contronyms. A contronym is a word with two or more opposite meanings, making it its own antonym. Click here to find out more about these quirky words.
 
Lily with the letter LWe've arrived at day J of the A to Z challenge, which should be my favorite day because J is for Jocelyn. Unfortunately, the contronym options have put a damper on my alphabet enthusiasm because there is only one, lonely choice for J: joint. And it’s not even a fun contronym – it certainly didn’t inspire me to make a movie.
 
I do have to hand it to joint in that it has an unexpectedly long list of definitions. In sticking with the contronym theme, these are the two key meanings:
 
 
 
Joint – to combine or attach with a joint or joints
 
~ or ~
 
Joint – to separate (meat) at the joints
 
Both of these verb definitions deal with activity at the primary noun version of joint (a place at which two or more things are joined); it's just that one is about dividing and one is about uniting. 
 
While I'm no vegetarian (mmmm... hamburgers!), I don't really want to post a picture of bloody meat being butchered, so I think I'll go with story time instead.
 
Mary met several men through an online dating site, and despite her initial fears, they were all lovely people - not a single serial killer among them. Unfortunately, even though they each had wonderful attributes, none of them were Mr. Right. But Mary was ready to settle down and realized her pickiness was going to result in her being forever alone.
 
So she invited all the men over for a party. As they made awkward small talk with each other, she watched, eyes roaming over each one, weighing their strengths and weakness.
 
One by one, they dropped to the floor, victims of the sedatives in their drinks. She dragged them to the basement.
 
Blake had amazing arms. They gave hugs that made her feel warm and safe. She jointed his arms at the shoulder and set them aside. 
 
Steve had wonderfully toned legs. He'd taken her dancing several times and whirled her around the floor making her feel like a professional ballroom dancer. She jointed his legs at the hip and set them aside.
 
Randy had elegant fingers. They produced beautiful music on several instruments. She jointed his hands at the wrists and set them aside.
 
skeletonTrevor had a joint that made her blush and swoon. She removed it and set it aside.
 
Jonathan had a handsome face and washboard abs that were delightful viewing. She jointed off the extra appendages and tossed them in the trash.
 
Then she jointed Blake's arms, Steve's legs, Randy's fingers, and Trevor's joint on to Jonathan's torso. A little electricity. A black magic chant. And presto! Mary no longer had to wait for the perfect man - she'd created her own.
 
So in summary: a picture of bloody meat = yucky; a story about chopping up several people = totally fine. Yep, I'm a weirdo.
 
Are you familiar with contronyms? Even though I could only find one ‘J’ contronym doesn’t mean there aren’t others out there - can you think of any? How Jovial is Lily with her letter J?
 
Image courtesy of renjith krishnan / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

Impossibly Impregnable

My theme for the Blogging from A to Z Challenge is contronyms. A contronym is a word with two or more opposite meanings, making it its own antonym. Click here to find out more about these quirky words.
 
Molly with the letter IThere weren’t many contronyms to choose from for the letter I. The options were so limited that one list even included this: “Inflammable: Burns easily ~~~ Does not burn (Only the first definition is correct; many wrongly assume that the prefix in- gives it the second meaning)” So basically it’s only on the list because the wrong definition is so commonly accepted that it kinda sorta makes inflammable a contronym. To be fair, it is weird that flammable and inflammable mean exactly the same thing even though they sound like opposites. I wonder if there’s a term for that.
 
Since inflammable is not technically a contronym, instead I’m featuring impregnable
 
Impregnable – strong enough to resist or withstand attack
 
~ or ~
 
Impregnable – susceptible to impregnation, fertile
 
I was a bit uneasy presenting this as the contronym because of all the recent unpleasantness with ignorant people making ridiculous proclamations about legitimate rape. I don’t want these posts to turn political; I just want to have some fun with quirky words. So my frame of reference is those films we had to watch in health class where the sperm struggled to break through the egg. And that leads me to make this mind-boggling statement: 
 
An egg that is impregnable is not impregnable.
 
And it works using the definitions in either order! Whoa, I think my brain might be leaking out of my ears. Since I can no longer form coherent words, how about some pictures? 
 
This is impregnable:
Castle
 
This is also impregnable:
Michelle Dugar ===>Duggar family
 
Are you familiar with contronyms? Can you think of any other ‘I’ contronyms out there? How Intriguing does Molly look with her letter I?
 
 

Castle image courtesy of xedos4 / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Duggar images courtesy of TLC

Highly Hysterical

My theme for the Blogging from A to Z Challenge is contronyms. A contronym is a word with two or more opposite meanings, making it its own antonym. Click here to find out more about these quirky words.
 
Chloe with the letter H
For the letter H, I’m featuring the contronym hysterical, a word that conveys opposite ends of the emotional spectrum.
 
Hysterical – causing unrestrained laughter; very funny
 
~ or ~
 
Hysterical – irrational from fear, emotion, or an emotional shock
 
I thought I’d try something a little different today to illustrate the two facets of hysterical. If you have arachnophobia, I warn you, do not press play! Here's the direct link if the embedded version isn't working.
 

Apologies if I traumatized anyone with that spider picture. I’m still twitchy just thinking about it. I’ll also offer up apologies for my terrible “voice acting.” If I had to make a living doing voice acting, it would be a race to see whether I starved to death or died of embarrassment first – I hate being behind the mic as much as I hate being in front of the camera
 
Are you familiar with contronyms? There are other ‘H’ contronyms out there, can you think of any? Doesn’t Chloe look Heroic with her letter H?
 
cat image courtesy of Nick Reffitt/lolcats.com 
spider image courtesy of documentingreality.com
 
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Glorious Garnish

Bailey with the letter GMy theme for the Blogging from A to Z Challenge is contronyms. A contronym is a word with two or more opposite meanings, making it its own antonym. Click here to find out more about these quirky words.
 
We start the second week of the A to Z Challenge with the letter G. There weren’t many G contronyms to choose from, but garnish was a clear winner to me. 
 
Garnish – to enhance by adding decorative touches
Garnish the food
 
~ or ~
 
Garnish – to take a debtor’s wages
Garnish the wages
 
Although one is usually used for food and the other for money, the meanings boil down to the opposites ‘to add to’ and ‘to take away from.’
 
The manager garnished the chef’s wages because he ate all the strawberries and instead garnished the desserts with cherry tomatoes.
 
Are you familiar with contronyms? Can you think of the other ‘G’ contronyms out there? Doesn’t Bailey look Gorgeous with her letter G?
 

Chef image courtesy of marin / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Money image courtesy of jannoon028 / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 
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Temporarily Tweet Tales Sunday Week 64

15 Minute Tweet TalesEven though we get Sundays off for good behavior during the Blogging from A to Z Challenge, I’m taking the same approach as last year with my 15 Minute Tweet Tales. Instead of posting them on the regular Tuesdays and cluttering up those posts, I’m going to temporarily post them on Sunday. Since I didn’t post this past Tuesday, there are more than usual.

And in a happy coincidence, I’m even able to keep my contronym theme going with this post because The Rare Words Book saw fit to provide a contronym on 4/6. Casuistry means:
 
The application of ethical rules to particular cases
 
~ or ~
 
The false application of ethical principals
 
And now here are my tweet tales:
 
3/27 - Bob ignores Tim's aposterioristic advice to not marry Amy; he might've listened if Tim confessed the affair, saving Bob heartbreak later.
 
3/28 - Amy giggles as her friends cantillate, "Light as a feather, stiff as a board." They step back; she floats in mid-air. Now Amy screams.
 
3/29 - Jon hunches over a microscope as the moans get closer. Kim yells, "Screw the etiology! The only thing that'll save us are head shots!"
 
3/30 - He traveled to the Hesperian reaches of the land and back but never found the man who killed his wife. Too bad he didn't own a mirror.
 
3/31 - To escape her life, Kim enters the woods with only a bottle of water. She emerges 3 days later forever changed by the numinous experience.
 
4/1 - They pretermitted the last gas station before the empty area of the mountains, resulting in a nightmare straight from a horror movie.
 
4/2 - Tina slaved over her Shakespeare paper, weaving in chiasmi to honor the Bard. Her prof honored himself by publishing it under his name.
 
4/3 - While watching his new Girls Gone Wild DVD, Jim spots his daughter. Appalled by her impudicity, he skips her part to enjoy the rest.
 
4/4 - Eunice's palmary roses were the envy of the county. The secret to her success? Cheating husbands make excellent fertilizer.
 
4/5 - Cops arrest Fred for lurking in neighbor's yard. He pleads guilty to scopophilia rather than admit double-checking body he buried there.
 
4/6 - It's ironic Prof. Smith teaches a course on casuistry considering the casuistry he uses to justify the secrets locked in his basement.
 
4/7 – Many years of practice had honed the syntomy of his break-up speeches, but Mona wasn’t one to be blown off and made him feel her pain.
 
Play along and write tweet tales for the above words. If you’re willing to share, post them on twitter with the hashtag #15tt or add them below in the comments because I’d love to read them. Any thoughts about this week's tweet tales or #15tt words?
 
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Fantastically Fast

My theme for the Blogging from A to Z Challenge is contronyms. A contronym is a word with two or more opposite meanings, making it its own antonym. Click here to find out more about these quirky words.
 
Freya with the letter FAfter having so few options yesterday, I was happy to find plenty of F contronyms to choose from for today. I’ve decided to feature fast because I wish I could move fast but am mostly stuck fast to the couch.
 
Fast – able to move quickly, swift
 
~ or ~
 
Fast – not easily moved, firmly fixed in place
 
How about a picture montage to illustrate the opposing meanings of fast?
 
These cuties are running extremely fast:
Running Dogs
But these cuties are stuck fast in the mud:
Buffalo in the mud
 
This car makes your eyes water because it’s so fast:
Fast Car
But this car is going nowhere fast because it’s trapped fast in the snow:
Car stuck in snow
 
This kid is making a fast getaway:
Boy Running
While this kid is held fast in her mother’s arms:
Mom hugging daughter
 
Are you familiar with contronyms? There are other ‘F’ contronyms out there, can you think of any? How Fabulous is Freya with her letter F?
 
Images courtesy of:
Running dogs - Rosen Georgiev/FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Buffalo - think4photop/FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Fast car - M - Pics/FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Snow car - WDRdesign
Boy running - chrisroll/FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Hugging - David Castillo Dominici/FreeDigitalPhotos.net
 
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Evidently Enjoin

My theme for the Blogging from A to Z Challenge is contronyms. A contronym is a word with two or more opposite meanings, making it its own antonym. Click here to find out more about these quirky words.
 
Lily with the letter E
It's slim pickings out there for an E contronym. In all my searching, I only found two. One was effectively, but I think it feels like a bit of a stretch. Here is how it was explained: "In effect (Doing the equivalent of the action but not the real thing) ~or~ With effect (Doing the action and doing it well) [Contrast 'He is effectively lying' with 'He is lying effectively']." Since this doesn't feel like a straightforward contronym to me, evidently I'm stuck using enjoin as today's example.
 
EnjoinEnjoin - to order to do something, prescribe 
 
~ or ~ 
 
Enjoin - to stop someone from doing something, prohibit (such as in law by an injunction)
 
Both definitions of enjoin are basically about being bossy - it's just that one is ordering a person TO DO something, whereas the other is ordering a person TO NOT DO something.
 
The doctor enjoined the trendy new drug for his patients because they were overwhelmed with so many worries about the world. Meanwhile, the judge enjoined production of the miracle pill because he feared for a world overrun by apathetic citizens. 
 
Blerg. What a boring contronym. If today is your first time stopping my blog for the A to Z challenge, then my apologies for such a blah day.
 
Are you familiar with contronyms? Even though I could not find any other E words on the various contronym lists, can you think of any? How Elegant is Lily with her letter E?
Bossy image courtesy of stockimages / FreeDigitalPhotos.net
 
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